Recommendations show that access to justice can be widened, and Scottish courts made a more attractive forum, says David Armstrong

When Sheriff Principal James Taylor was invited by the Scottish Government to carry out a root and branch review of the funding of civil litigation in Scotland to modernise the system and widen access to justice, he could have been forgiven for feeling daunted by the monumental task that lay ahead of him.

Two years later, his Review of Expenses and Funding of Civil Litigation in Scotland now published, the former Sheriff Principal of Glasgow and Strathkelvin has struck a deft balance between the competing interests of the parties involved in litigation – individuals, small businesses, major corporations and legal advisers – to produce a report that promises a new era of modernisation, efficiency and effectiveness for the Scottish court system.

His 85 recommendations show that access to justice can be widened, and Scottish courts made a more attractive forum for resolving commercial disputes, not by sweeping away the current arrangements but rather by adapting and amending them, while at the same time proposing some interesting and genuinely radical new approaches.

Source: The Scotsman